Origin by Dan Brown

Origin by Dan Brown


3.87  ·  Rating details ·  19,310 Ratings  ·  2,952 Reviews
Origin by Dan Brown download or read it online for free here
Origin by Dan Brown
Robert Langdon, Harvard professor of symbology and religious iconology, arrives at the ultramodern Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao to attend a major announcement—the unveiling of a discovery that “will change the face of science forever.” The evening’s host is Edmond Kirsch, a forty-year-old billionaire and futurist whose dazzling high-tech inventions and audacious predictions have made him a renowned global figure. Kirsch, who was one of Langdon’s first students at Harvard two decades earlier, is about to reveal an astonishing breakthrough . . . one that will answer two of the fundamental questions of human existence.

As the event begins, Langdon and several hundred guests find themselves captivated by an utterly original presentation, which Langdon realizes will be far more controversial than he ever imagined. But the meticulously orchestrated evening suddenly erupts into chaos, and Kirsch’s precious discovery teeters on the brink of being lost forever. Reeling and facing an imminent threat, Langdon is forced into a desperate bid to escape Bilbao. With him is Ambra Vidal, the elegant museum director who worked with Kirsch to stage the provocative event. Together they flee to Barcelona on a perilous quest to locate a cryptic password that will unlock Kirsch’s secret.

Navigating the dark corridors of hidden history and extreme religion, Langdon and Vidal must evade a tormented enemy whose all-knowing power seems to emanate from Spain’s Royal Palace itself . . . and who will stop at nothing to silence Edmond Kirsch. On a trail marked by modern art and enigmatic symbols, Langdon and Vidal uncover clues that ultimately bring them face-to-face with Kirsch’s shocking discovery . . . and the breathtaking truth that has long eluded us.

“Historically, the most dangerous men on earth were men of God…especially when their gods became threatened.”

“Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm. —WINSTON CHURCHILL”






 

 

Reviews


     Where do we come from?
    Where are we going?


Yes, it's the new Dan Brown book. Yes, it's pulpy and ridiculous. But I have to say it-- it was really entertaining, too.

The thing about Brown is that he's a mediocre-at-best writer with really fascinating ideas. If you spend too much time analysing individual scenes and sentences, then you're going to start to see the cracks, big and small. Big cracks like world-renowned scientists jumping to ludicrous conclusions, and small cracks like world-renowned scientists suddenly knowing nothing about a subject so that Robert Langdon can inform them (and the reader) of some exciting tidbit.

And Langdon himself must be the stupidest genius ever written. He knows absolutely everything about everything until it's convenient for him to not know something so someone can explain it to him.

BUT, for some reason, Brown's plots and codes and puzzles are interesting enough to... kind of make it okay. At least for me. I love all the information about history, science and religion. I love how you can look up the organizations mentioned and find that they are all real. It's very much a plot over writing book, but sometimes that can be exactly what you need. Mindless, pageturning entertainment.

In Origin, famous scientist and billionaire Edmond Kirsch is about to make a world-changing announcement. His research and technology have led him to make a discovery about the origin of humankind, as well as their future destiny, that will shake the foundations of the world, tear apart religions, and change absolutely everything. He has essentially found answers to the two questions: Where do we come from? and Where are we going?

It's hard not to be drawn in by these universal questions. Then when the announcement event goes horribly wrong and it seems his discovery might be buried forever, Robert Langdon and Ambra Vidal must go on a clue-solving, code-breaking spree across Spain to uncover Kirsch's discovery. Throughout, all I could think was "what could his discovery be?" It would need to be something dramatic enough, something with impact... and, well, personally I loved the reveal.

    Fake news now carries as much weight as real news.


Origin draws on current events and hot topics to make it more relevant to today's world. Brown touches on subjects like "fake news", the advancement of technology and artificial intelligence, and the dark corners of the Internet. He may not be an amazing writer - whatever that means - but he does play on universal thoughts, fears and questions. It makes for a very compelling tale.

I wouldn't recommend this to anyone looking for excellent writing, well-developed characters and a whole lot of sense-making. But if you want to sprint through an almost 500-page novel at breakneck pace and escape from thinking for a while, then it is very enjoyable.
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Dan Brown is back with some of his best work in a while. I was not a huge fan of his last two – Inferno and The Lost Symbol. I think for me they seemed kind of stale after Angels & Demons and The Da Vinci Code. Origin is now probably my second favorite of his (behind Angels and Demons).

Some of the key points:

Religion and Science – this is a big battle in our world today. It is an exhausting battle for someone like me who goes to church but also loves science. I worry that the feeling is starting to be that the two cannot exist together. Dan Brown does a great job of addressing this debate in this book (even though at times I was worried that it was going to end up just being another annoying commentary on the same debate)

Lead Female Characters – Brown amuses me with every new lead female character. It is always a scientist, art expert, museum curator, etc. who just so happens to be one of the top 5 most beautiful women alive (he has 5 Langdon books, each with one of those top 5 ;) )

The Dan Brown formula – I will say that each of Brown’s book has basically the same structure. A mystery starts (usually in a museum, church, famous building). Langdon meets a woman (see above). Langdon and this woman run around trying to solve the mystery. Yes, that formula is here. However, that felt okay this time. The last two books it felt like old hat – almost like he was phoning it in. But, with this one I was kind of glad to get back into the same formula and he developed the plot and suspense well.

If you like Dan Brown – I recommend this.

If you thought maybe the Langdon series had no gas left – I recommend this.

If you want an interesting, thought-provoking mystery with a lot of suspense – I recommend this.
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FIVE STARS and FIVE MORE!!
Nothing is invented, for its written in nature first. Originality consists of returning to the Origin." -Antoni Gaudi

Where did we come from? Where are we going? These are the two most basic, yet important questions mankind asks of itself. For thousands of years man has struggled with these questions and, in an attempt to fill the void where there is no definite absolute, has created stories and gods to explain the inexplicable.

This book, which is one of the most thrilling books I've read in ages, looks at the science behind "the Origin" while taking Robert Langdon and us on a mind blowing trip around Spain! Dan Brown began writing Science Fiction before he started his Langdon series. Origin harkens back to those days when his books were filled with startling scientific data more than religious codes and dogma. While there still is the religious aspect in the book, the sheer volume of scientific data in Origin is staggering - especially if you are fact checking everything as I was doing. I suspect there will be those who find the science in this book too overwhelming and will not enjoy the book as a result. I, however, wanted MORE!

Yes, there is a questioning of blind religious faith. Yes, Brown does once again shed light on extremists within the Catholic Church - as we should on all extremism. Yes, Brown does force the reader to look at fascism in a hard, cold light - AS WE ALL SHOULD!!! This book is one of the most timely, relevant fiction based on fact novels published in a long time. Already there are those who are saying it is "tripe." I daresay that they have not read the book OR it pointed a finger at them and they felt uncomfortable. This is not a "typical Dan Brown tromp." It is far better than that. The writing is impeccable, the characters fully developed and the research is thorough and well sussed. Moreover, it is a thriller that will keep you guessing until the end of the book which is exactly what thrillers should do.

And that, my friends, does not even allow for the surprise twist at the end!! The answer to "where are we going" left me dumbfounded, speechless, flabbergasted!! Yes. YES. YES!!! OMGOSH!!! The entire book is worth reading just to get to that point!! I almost closed the books hen I read it! I was too emotionally overwhelmed - but - the ending is beautiful! This a MUST READ book!! Go. Now. Get this book!!

I leave you with this riddle:
Ampersand phone home
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Origin is not likely to win literary awards nor garner critical acclaim; for what it's worth though, it is darn entertaining.

Ever since I've picked up The Da Vinci Code, I've been hooked on the Robert Langdon books. I admit that I have a weakness for the formula Dan Brown utilises for his thrillers, employing an intoxicating mix of history, art, poetry, symbols, codes, and famous landmarks or architecture. A rousing adventure through exotic and renowned locations that have me reaching for Google search ever so often.

As usual, all the architecture and locations mentioned are real, and again it fuelled the wanderlust in me. This time with Spain as the backdrop, we have the bizarre and breath-taking Guggenheim Bilbao as the opening venue with a fair amount of exposition on some of its more notable modern art exhibits. Robert Langdon will then, of course, find himself heading from one famous location or landmark to another. The narrative becomes info-dumpy at these parts of the story; a little more than usual in this novel, which does make the pacing slower.

It goes without saying that the author went through a lot of research to produce his Robert Langdon series and it shows. This is probably the most critical component of his books which makes them so enjoyable for me. One that overcomes the fact that his stories are repetitive and his prose ordinary.

Nothing has changed as far as his plot structure and characterisation are concerned. It all starts with a murder, and somehow Robert will end up on the run, with a beautiful sidekick (be it a museum director or a scientist or some other expert of sorts), from some national guard or local police as well as an assassin with a tragic past. At the same time, he is also running against time to solve pertinent clues to unwind the mystery, etc. That said, there seemed to be less code-solving in this novel, which was a bit of a downer.

The real history that underscored this narrative highlighted the dark times of Spain under the military dictator, Francisco Franco. With the current political crisis in the same country, I couldn't help feeling that some strange twist of fate is at work here that would have this novel being released around the same time.

Origin will not win any points for originality. It is, however, a real page-turner. Despite not having the breakneck pace of some of its predecessors, I still find myself engrossed and captivated, unable to put the book down.

What I found compelling is the underlying theme which resonated quite deeply with me. It is about creation and destiny, and the vast divide between religion and science in answering the universal questions of 'Where do we come from?' and 'Where are we going?' It deals with relevant current issues around rapid technological advancements, especially in artificial intelligence and wearable technology, and the propagation of sensational or fake news fuelling conspiracy theories through ungovernable internet media.

If you are looking for non-cerebral page-turning entertainment, or if you are a Robert Langdon fan like me who can overlook certain flaws, I will recommend Origin.

To conclude, I'd like to post a quote of relevance to the story, from one of the world's greatest and most renowned scientists, who had been very outspoken about his religious views:

A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty - it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude; in this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man.

- Albert Einstein
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 4.Pi to the sixth digit.
4.3141592 to be exact.

Mr. Brown, why dost thou hate the Catholic Church?
I read an article where Mr. Brown stated that he writes what he wants to read. I am certainly glad for that because he writes what I want to read too.
His books have been criticized for being formulaic and I agree that they are to a certain extent. But if I cared enough and had time enough I could list several more authors who churn out book after book that are also formulaic in nature who don't receive the same criticisms and harsh words about it as Mr. Brown does.
Enough of that, here are my thoughts on Origin.
Because the subject matter dealt with comparative myth and religion the story was right in my wheelhouse. I guessed who was behind all the shenanigans at about the half way point but that didn't deter from my enjoyment of the story.
The reason I decided not to rate this 5 stars is because some of the "info dumps" felt like I was reading Wikipedia entries. While learning about famous people, places, and things can be enlightening too much of it took me out of the flow of the narrative.
For example, there is a short explanation of the history of the ampersand (&) which was clever and interesting but on the other side of the coin was the many page exposition on the architecture of the Guggenheim Museum.
When I think about Langdon I can not help but picture Tom Hanks. When I picture Tom Hanks I picture Forrest Gump. Forrest Gump once said, "life is a box of chocolates, you never know what you are gonna get". Well with Dan Brown you know what you are going to get. For me Dan Brown is the chocolate with the caramel inside and I love caramel. Yes it is familiar but that doesn't mean it doesn't taste good.
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YES I HAVE READ THE BOOK ALREADY! I HATE PEOPLE WHO RATE BEFORE THEY HAVE EVEN READ IT!


I called in sick (as much as you can call in sick from your weekly volunteer job) and cancelled a doctor's appt. to be home to get parcel from Amazon/Canada Post.

Sat down .. read it through straight to the end. 6 hours and 22 minute --- or approx. the length of 10 Danielle Steel reads.

Want to know what the book was about? Well ... read the synopsis.

I thoroughly enjoyed it but I now want a honking big glass of Spanish wine AND some tapas.
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Robert Langdon, my dear old friend, thank you for coming back to me!

Okay. So.

Origin is another signature page-turning, heart-pounding, thought-provoking, Dan Brown novel. This Langdon thriller differs, however, in many respects from the previous four. Do you need to read the other Langdon novels to understand this one? NO. Each Langdon novel is very distinct. In fact, the nods to Robert Langdon's previous adventures are so minimal and slight that it's as though Langdon hasn't been involved in almost destroying the world a couple of times. Robert Langdon is like Seattle Grace Hospital (Grey's Anatomy). Why the hell would anyone continue to go to Seattle Grace Hospital? Well, the same goes for Langdon: why the hell would anyone invite Langdon along to, well, anything!? Anyways, I digress.

The main difference for this one is that this one was predictive rather than reactive, by which I mean Dan Brown is tackling the future (for the most part) instead of looking back at history. This may lack some punch for some readers who have become accustomed to Brown tackling controversial issues of human history (think Da Vinci Code, Lost Symbol, Angels & Demons). Here's a further explanation of what I mean:

Sure, Dan Brown does examine history in this novel; I mean, the title of the book literally is Origin . Buttttt, he isn't so much looking back at human history as he is looking back at the history of how life began. Hence, the first major question being asked in this novel: Where do we come from? And the answer Brown offers up is very thought-provoking and intriguing. And although there is a lot of truth (but also some conjecture) you can see how the implications of this finding would be earth-shattering for religion.

That said, the real point of this novel is to come to a conclusion about what happens to humans in the future. Hence the second main question posed in this novel: Where are we going? The answer to this question is purely conjecture (obviously we can't predict the future) but it is also very thought-provoking. I won't give anything away to someone who hasn't read the book yet, but I'll say that there is likely a lot of truth to where we are going...because it's already happening....

As to what I mean when I say this book is more predictive than reactive. Dan Brown incorporates a lot of descriptive art, architecture, and history, to give the illusion that there is a clue-filled historical hunt being undertaken, as was the case with Brown's famous novels like The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons. However, this really is just an illusion of an historical hunt. There is nothing of the sort taking place in Origin. In Origin, there are hardly any clues hidden in paintings, hardly any ancient symbols left out for Langdon to solve. In The Da Vinci Code, Brown ingeniously devised a plot out of hundred-year-old symbology in paintings and sculptures, and often the reader was left gasping at these startlingly believable and thought-provoking clues. There is almost none of that in Origin. Mostly, this is just a thriller, through and through. It's a race against the clock, with history and art sprinkled in to give it that nice Dan Brown flavour. But, as I mentioned, those sprinkles are just an illusion. This book predicts the future and uses modern technology to do so, which is what makes it a book of prediction. It uses super-powerful computers to help aid Langdon and his beautiful sidekick through to the conclusion. There is a handy-dandy character in this book named Winston (those who've read this know who I'm talking about *wink wink*), without whom Langdon would have gotten nowhere. Winston is the deus ex machina for this book.

Part of my disappointment with this book was that it felt as though Brown got lazy with his puzzles and clues. His previous books used clever and sometimes ingenious clues. The clues in this one were kind of lazy and easy. I mean, even I knew what BIO-EC346 was... I came to realize this book wasn't so much about the journey as it was the outcome. The outcome ended up being worthwhile, which was a relief.

In many ways, this book is eerily relevant. Kirsch is essentially Elon Musk (who happens to be a good friend of Kirsch). And the central question of where we are going toys with our sense of morality. What do we want from our future? Do we have a choice, even? You will find yourself wondering just how much damage humans are doing with their complacency and ignorance to the power of artificial intelligence. The painful reality is that, for the majority of society (the poor and powerless), we have no choice in the matter of where we are heading.

One thing to caution someone who picks this book up: be patient. The book does get good, but you have to get yourself through the first 200 pages or so, then the action starts.

A few little cool bits I picked up on. Langdon mentions a hotel he once ate at in Spain: Gran Hotel Princesa Sofia - a cute little reference to Princess Sofia from Da Vinci Code. Also, on page 428: the king of Spain tells his son, "And history has proven repeatedly that lunatics will rise to power again and again on tidal waves of aggressive nationalism and intolerance, even in places where it seems utterly incomprehensible.....that light will fade unless we illuminate the minds of our future generations." Probably a jab at a current somebody holding the highest office in America.

Anyway, another great novel and so happy to see Langdon return. Well worth the read, in my opinion! Pick this book up, engage your mind, and have a discussion with your friends. That's the purpose of Dan Brown books, after all.
Source: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32283133-origin

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